disabilityinkidlit:

This middle grade book (now out from tubooks!) sounds adorable!

A monster is loose in England!And it’s kind of Jin’s fault that Zilombo got loose.Jin tracks the monster, but he can’t figure out how to get her back into the artifact from which she hatched. Then Jin meets Chief Inspector of Ancient Artifacts A. J. Zauyamakanda—Mizz Z, for short—who has arrived to inspect the artifact. She and Jin team up to find Zilombo.Joining them is Frankie, Jin’s older sister, who has lost their baby brother—and Zilombo is the most likely culprit for his disappearance. Zilombo gains new, frightening powers every time she hatches. Now the monster is cleverer than ever before … and she likes to eat babies!Will Jin’s baby brother be next on Zilombo’s menu? As the monster’s powers continue to grow, Jin, Frankie, and Mizz Z must find a way to outsmart Zilombo!

Even better, it features a disabled main character: Jin has dyspraxia. Dyspraxia isn’t written about often—this is the only book featuring this condition on our list, in fact—so we’re curious to find out how it’s portrayed.
If anyone with dyspraxia has read The Monster in the Mudball—or would like to, in which case we can likely provide you with a copy!—and wants to write a review for Disability in Kidlit, please let us know.

disabilityinkidlit:

This middle grade book (now out from tubooks!) sounds adorable!

A monster is loose in England!

And it’s kind of Jin’s fault that Zilombo got loose.

Jin tracks the monster, but he can’t figure out how to get her back into the artifact from which she hatched. Then Jin meets Chief Inspector of Ancient Artifacts A. J. Zauyamakanda—Mizz Z, for short—who has arrived to inspect the artifact. She and Jin team up to find Zilombo.

Joining them is Frankie, Jin’s older sister, who has lost their baby brother—and Zilombo is the most likely culprit for his disappearance. Zilombo gains new, frightening powers every time she hatches. Now the monster is cleverer than ever before … and she likes to eat babies!

Will Jin’s baby brother be next on Zilombo’s menu? As the monster’s powers continue to grow, Jin, Frankie, and Mizz Z must find a way to outsmart Zilombo!

Even better, it features a disabled main character: Jin has dyspraxiaDyspraxia isn’t written about often—this is the only book featuring this condition on our list, in fact—so we’re curious to find out how it’s portrayed.

If anyone with dyspraxia has read The Monster in the Mudball—or would like to, in which case we can likely provide you with a copy!—and wants to write a review for Disability in Kidlit, please let us know.

richincolor:

It’s finally here! The Shadow Hero’s release date is this week. I reviewed it back in March and have been waiting impatiently for the release ever since. This was one of the best books I have read so far this year. Even if you aren’t a graphic novel, super hero kind of reader, this one is worth a try.

Title: The Shadow Hero
AuthorGene Luen Yang
Illustrator: Sonny Liew
Publisher: First Second

Summary: In the comics boom of the 1940s, a legend was born: the Green Turtle. He solved crimes and fought injustice just like the other comics characters. But this mysterious masked crusader was hiding something more than your run-of-the-mill secret identity… The Green Turtle was the first Asian American super hero.

The comic had a short run before lapsing into obscurity, but the acclaimed author of American Born Chinese, Gene Luen Yang, has finally revived this character in Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel that creates an origin story for the Green Turtle.

With artwork by Sonny Liew, this gorgeous, funny comics adventure for teens is a new spin on the long, rich tradition of American comics lore. – Cover image via Goodreads, summary via publisher

Another book being released is Dirty Wings by Sarah McCarry. Kelly Jensen wrote an excellent review here. It’s the second book in a series, but Kelly explained that it could easily be read on its own.

Title: Dirty Wings (All Our Pretty Songs #2)
Author: Sarah McCarry
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Summary: A gorgeous retelling of the Persephone myth, Sarah McCarry brings us the story of Cass and Maia–the mothers from All Our Pretty Songs–and how their fates became intertwined.

Maia is a teenage piano prodigy and dutiful daughter, imprisoned in the oppressive silence of her adoptive parents’ house like a princess in an ivory tower. Cass is a street rat, witch, and runaway, scraping by with her wits and her knack for a five-fingered discount. When a chance encounter brings the two girls together, an unlikely friendship blossoms that will soon change the course of both their lives. Cass springs Maia from the jail of the only world she’s ever known, and Maia’s only too happy to make a break for it. But Cass didn’t reckon on Jason, the hypnotic blue-eyed rocker who’d capture Maia’s heart as soon as Cass set her free–and Cass isn’t the only one who’s noticed Maia’s extraordinary gifts. Is Cass strong enough to battle the ancient evil she’s unwittingly awakened–or has she walked into a trap that will destroy everything she cares about? In this time, like in any time, love is a dangerous game. – Cover image and summary via Goodreads

richincolor:

I haven’t heard of this series until now, but that cover is amazing. Maybe I should add this series to my list?

image

This epic clash of sand and sea will pit brother against brother-and there can only be one winner

In two days, the race for the Sea Court throne will be over-but all the rules…

ppaction:

This week marks the 42nd anniversary of Title IX, which prohibits sex discrimination in educational programs that receive federal funds. Title IX opened doors for women and girls in school to pursue sciences and sports, and also protects women from sexual harassment and violence — although there’s still a lot of work to do to eradicate sexual violence on campus. 

Happy birthday, Title IX. Here’s to continuing to make school a more equal place for women.

(h/t National Women’s Law Center)

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you like Anna and the French Kiss, try Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg because both YA novels are upbeat, funny, romantic stories set in boarding schools.

cbcdiversity:

The “Freedom Summer” of 1964 was a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark year in American history. Here is a list of 14 children’s books that deal specifically with the remarkable events of 1964 – and 3 additional…

richincolor:

My head has been spinning with all of the discussions and activism around diversity in children’s and YA lit lately. It has been a wild ride since February actually. The CCBC-Netdiscussion in February was centered around Multicultural Literature. I loved that Sarah Hamburg asked us what activism would look like to each of us. It made me stop and think about the many possible ways that an individual could work toward change. I responded and many others did also. Ultimately, Sarah gathered the results and they were posted on many blogs such as Crazy QuiltEdi. During that discussion, School Library Journal announced that they would be devoting an entire issue to Diversity in May. I was able to write an article from the Teacher Librarian perspective. In case you missed it, the issue is still available online and has many excellent articles.

Next up was the announcement of a BookCon panel of all stars from the kid lit world which they planned with all white men. Kelly Jensen explained it well here. The result of that particularly glaring example of ignoring diversity inspired the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign. Amazing things have been happening ever since and I am excited about the potential for change.

One of the best ways to support diverse lit is to buy it, read it, and let other people know about the amazing books you find. Above are some of the books I plan to read and talk about this summer. Do you have some books on your summer reading list? Have you read any amazing books already this summer? We’d love to hear about any that have caught your attention.